Wishful Universalism

An obsession of mine ever since I read the sermon Justice by George MacDonald has been universalism, or universal salvation. (Anyone familiar with my blog will be aware of this.) Recently, I’ve come under the impression that universalism has been a major spiritual red herring for me.

I remember reading someone who said that debates about universalism–the idea that in the end, every single person and demon will be reconciled with God in a salvific manner–divert our attention from the kairos of today to the open and as of yet unknown future of God the “all in all” (1 Corinthians 15:28, Ephesians 1:23). It does not matter whether or not all are saved in the future if I am not willing to suffer for the good of others in the present.

Today, I still believe that universalism is a serious possibility for Christian eschatology. With folks like Origen of Alexandria, St. Gregory of Nyssa, Karl Barth, Hans Urs von Balthasar, Jürgen Moltmann, and David Bentley Hart, I wholeheartedly desire the salvation of every single creature; however, I will henceforth submit the outcome of the future to God and enter wholly into the task of loving the world with Christ now.

The Matthew 18:14 and 2 Peter 3:9 Alternative for All Christians

Every Christian can be a wishful universalist. Unlike “hopeful universalism,” which does not assert universalism but regards it as a possibility (something similar to my position), wishful universalism agrees with the heart of God in Christ as revealed in Matthew 18:14 and 2 Peter 3:9. God is “wishing that none should perish, but that all might reach repentance” (2 Pet. 3:9). It appears that God is a wishful universalist! And we should all be wishful universalists, even if we have not the assurance or epistemic certification to consider it a realized or otherwise serious possibility.

 

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